Quantifiers quiz

Sometimes these words will tell the reader or listener whether we're referring to a specific or general thing the garage out back; A horse!

A horse! My kingdom for a horse! The choice of the proper article or determiner to precede a noun or noun phrase is usually not a problem for writers who have grown up speaking English, nor is it a serious problem for non-native writers whose first language is a romance language such as Spanish.

For other writers, though, this can be a considerable obstacle on the way to their mastery of English.

quantifiers quiz

Determiners are said to "mark" nouns. That is to say, you know a determiner will be followed by a noun. Some categories of determiners are limited there are only three articles, a handful of possessive pronouns, etc. This limited nature of most determiner categories, however, explains why determiners are grouped apart from adjectives even though both serve a modifying function.

We can imagine that the language will never tire of inventing new adjectives; the determiners except for those possessive nounson the other hand, are well established, and this class of words is not going to grow in number. The demonstratives this, that, these, those, such are discussed in the section on Demonstrative Pronouns.

Quantifiers Some vs Any vs A MCQ Grammar Quiz – Test – Exercise

Notice that the possessive nouns differ from the other determiners in that they, themselves, are often accompanied by other determiners: " my mother's rug," " the priests's collar," " a dog's life. Like articles, quantifiers are words that precede and modify nouns. They tell us how many or how much. Selecting the correct quantifier depends on your understanding the distinction between Count and Non-Count Nouns.

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For our purposes, we will choose the count noun trees and the non-count noun dancing :. In formal academic writing, it is usually better to use many and much rather than phrases such as a lot of, lots of and plenty of.

There is an important difference between "a little" and "little" used with non-count words and between "a few" and "few" used with count words. If I say that Tashonda has a little experience in management that means that although Tashonda is no great expert she does have some experience and that experience might well be enough for our purposes. If I say that Tashonda has little experience in management that means that she doesn't have enough experience.

If I say that Charlie owns few books on Latin American literature, that means he doesn't have enough for our purposes and we'd better go to the library. Unless it is combined with ofthe quantifier "much" is reserved for questions and negative statements:. Note that the quantifier "most of the" must include the definite article the when it modifies a specific noun, whether it's a count or a non-count noun: "most of the instructors at this college have a doctorate"; "most of the water has evaporated.

HarperCollins: New York. Examples our own. An indefinite article is sometimes used in conjunction with the quantifier manythus joining a plural quantifier with a singular noun which then takes a singular verb :. This construction lends itself to a somewhat literary effect some would say a stuffy or archaic effect and is best used sparingly, if at all.

Determiners Quiz

The predeterminers occur prior to other determiners as you would probably guess from their name. The multipliers precede plural count and mass nouns and occur with singular count nouns denoting number or amount:.

In fractional expressionswe have a similar construction, but here it can be replaced with "of" construction.Present Perfect.

quantifiers quiz

Present Simple Passive Present Simple vs. Online Membership Download the Entire Library. Much, Many, A few, A little Worksheet. This free quantifiers worksheet helps students learn and practice how to use much, many, a few and a little with countable or uncountable nouns.

Give each student a copy of the worksheet. Students start by sorting nouns into countable and uncountable nouns. Next, students complete questions using the quantifiers 'much' or 'many' with the nouns from the first exercise.

Students then complete answers to the questions with 'a little' or 'a few'. In the last exercise, students write 'much' or 'many' questions and answers using 'a little' or 'a few' for other countable and uncountable nouns. When the students have finished, check their questions and answers together as a class. Here is a free interactive PDF version of the above worksheet for people teaching English online.

In the interactive worksheet, students complete a variety of online exercises to learn how to use much, many, a few and a little with countable or uncountable nouns. Much, Many, Some, Any Worksheet. This useful quantifiers worksheet helps students learn the grammatical rules associated with much, many, some and any. Working alone, students complete the 20 sentences on the worksheet with much, many, some or any.

When the students have finished, check the answers with the class by asking each student to read out a sentence. Next, the students look at the sentences on the worksheet and think about the grammar rules for using the four quantifiers. Students then complete a gap-fill text, explaining the grammar rules. Afterwards, review the rules with the class. This is an interactive PDF version of the above worksheet for English teachers working online. In the interactive worksheet, students do online exercises to learn the grammatical rules for much, many, some and any.

Place your bets. In this entertaining quantifiers worksheet activity, students identify and correct errors in sentences that contain quantifiers.

The students read the sentences on the worksheet, some of which contain errors in the use of quantifiers. If the students think a sentence is right, they put a tick in the first column of the worksheet.

If they think a sentence is wrong, they put a cross and correct the mistake. When the students have finished, they bet on their answers, depending on how confident they are about their decisions. Students bet between 10 and points for each item. When the students have placed a bet for each sentence, elicit the correct answers from the class.

If students guessed correctly, they win the amount they bet. If they guessed incorrectly, they lose that amount. The student with the highest grand total at the end is the winner.

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Place your bets - Interactive Worksheet. Here is an interactive PDF version of the above activity for people who teach English online. In the interactive worksheet, students complete an online exercise where they identify and correct errors in sentences that contain quantifiers.

Shopping Run. In this fun quantifiers game, students use 'a few' and 'a little' alternately with countable and uncountable shopping items.The noun is unspecific, any. The word cattle is an exception. Cattle is the collective noun for cowsbulls, steer and heifers.

A steer is a young castrated male. A heifer is a young female. A cow is a mature female that has reproduced had calves. A bull is a mature male that can reproduce sexually. Food substances are not usually countable unless they have quantifiers. They are either too small to count, or they are liquids. Slice the tomatoes very thin. Your delicious, healthy salad is ready to enjoy! Discourse Well. Diagnostics Int. Diagnostics Sec.

FLAT a stack of pancakes with a pat of butter tortillas toast. Meat Quantifiers Specify a quantity by cut. A cow is a mature female that has reproduced had calves A bull is a mature male that can reproduce sexually. Select the response from the list that best completes the sentence. Compare your responses to the feedback by clicking the "Check" or "Check " button.

Meat from a calf the baby is called — beef calf pork veal lamb. Feedback 1. Meat from a pig is called — calf chicken pork pig lamb. Feedback 2. Feedback 3. Meat from a sheep is called — calf chicken sheep goat lamb. Feedback 4. Meat from a chicken male or rooster is called -- chicken goat pork veal lamb. Feedback 5.

Discrete Math 1 - Tutorial 42 - Quantifiers Quiz

A slice of beef or veal is called — a steak a slice a leg a ham a roast. Feedback 6. A large cooked piece of meat beef, lamb, pork, veal, chicken, etc.We use them in negative sentences and questions. We use how many and how much to ask about quantity. We use a lot of or lots of more informal before both plural countable and uncountable nouns. We normally use them in positive sentences. We use some in affirmative sentences and any in negative sentences and questions.

Both some and any can be used before countable and uncountable nouns. But if we use them before a countable noun, the noun must be in plural form. Do the exercises. Exercises Explanation Exercises: 1 2 3 4 5. Exercise 1 Choose much, many, little, few, some, any to complete each sentence.

We need to stop and get some. It was nearly empty. Were there many people in the party? You eat too many biscuits. How many concerts have you ever been to? How much coffee have you had today? She spends a lot of time watching TV. We had lots of good moments together. I have to do a few things this afternoon. He always gets good results with very little effort.

Can you put a bit of sugar in the tea? Is there any sugar in the cupboard? Have you got any new friends? I have some questions to ask you. Are there any students in the classroom? NOT Is there any student in the classroom? Would you like some help? Can I have some tea, please?

quantifiers quiz

Exercises: 1 2 3 4 5. Related tests: much, many, a lot of, a little, a few. We use cookies to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. By continuing you agree to our use of cookies.Or after the first auxiliary verb when there are auxiliary verbs.

We say all day, all night, all month, all year, etc. Note that when we use either in the subject, we can always use a singular verb, but the verb can also be plural if it appears after a plural noun.

Note that when we use neither in the subject, we can always use a singular verb, but the verb can also be plural if it appears after a plural noun. Do the exercises. Exercises Explanation Exercises: 1 2 3 4. Exercise 1 Choose the correct option to complete the sentences below. All plants need water. All of the plants in the garden were burned. All of them were at the event. We all went. They were all happy. We can all be there when she arrives.

Everything is big in the U. NOT All is big Everybody was at the party. Most people trust science. Most of the people at the club were underage. Most of us come from poor families. Both Jane and Margaret passed the exam. Both of the students passed the exam. Both of them passed the exam. We both went.

They were both happy. We can both be there when she arrives. I like neither of them. I have no friends. Do you have any friends? You can come any weekend. Any idiot would know how to use this phone. None of them is from France. Exercises: 1 2 3 4. Related tests: much, many, a lot, little, few, some, any, no — quantifiers. We use cookies to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic.

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If loading fails, click here to try again. Your answers are highlighted below. Question 1. Question 2. Question 3. Question 4.

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Are there … supermarkets in your neighborhood? Question 5. Question 6. Question 7. A Are there … birds in the tree?

Quantifiers – all, most, both, either, neither, any, no, none

Question 8. Thomas needs … box of colored pencils to finish his picture. Question 9. My sister went to a movie theater with … friends. Question There are … cookies on the table. I need … minute to finish my work, and then I can leave. Stewart bought … dozen eggs and … tomatoes.

Many programs on TV are quite boring, but … programs are okay. I have … really good friend. Her name is Cathy. We have to bring … money with us.Skip to main content.

Sometimes we use a quantifier in the place of a determiner :. Most children start school at the age of five. We ate some bread and butter. We saw lots of birds.

Quantifiers

We can use these quantifiers with both count and uncount nouns:. We have lots of time. Joe has lots of friends. I can't go out. I've got no money.

There was a lot of food but no drinks. We have loads of time. Joe has plenty of friends. There was heaps of food. We do not normally use the quantifier some in negative and interrogative sentences. We normally use any :. Do you have any children? Did you see any friends? We don't have any children. I didn't see any friends. We saw some lions at the zoo, but we didn't see any tigers. Would you like some tea? I want some apples, please.

There were hundreds of people at the meeting. Would you like a little wine? Could I have a bit of butterplease? These quantifiers are used particularly with abstract nouns such as timemoney and trouble :.

It will probably cost a great deal of money. He spent a good deal of time watching television. We put a noun directly after a quantifier when we are talking about members of a group in general :. Few snakes are dangerous. Most children like chocolate. I never have enough money. Few of the snakes in this zoo are dangerous. Most of the boys at my school play football. Both of the chairs in my office are broken.


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